Invasion!? Squid Girl #22 — Meat, Sausage Grinding, and Snow

December 12th, 2011

 

Why can’t she just fight Santa or something? Even KKN was smart enough to pull that trick.

Impressions:

Oh boy, yet another grilling segment where meat is somehow a rare luxury (do not even begin quoting Japanese food customs at me) and a character devolves into a long monologue about how to get all the meat for themselves before failing due to overthinking it. Only instead of one obligatory throwaway joke like in most shows, it goes on and on and on for a full eight minues. Then Ayumi learns to protect herself by watching Chizuru beat up Goro through a series of montages of her hitting him. That leaves the third segment, I guess, where the scientists invent a machine that covers the beach in a blizzard. So they build a snowman. Then look at it. They build an igloo. Then sit in it. And finally, get lost in a blizzard.

Yeah, even for Squid thing, it was a rather poor showing. I’m ready for next season, where the comedies will have jokes and the ‘action’ shows aren’t so ridiculous that they’re funnier than the comedies. …Hey, a man can dream, can’t he? At least if anything, next season is looking to decimate the line between stupidity and sense with a forklift and go careening off a cliff into the abyss.

Preview:

How can you hypnotize what doesn’t have a brain?

Posted in Squid Girl | 5 Comments »

5 Shouts From the Peanut Gallery

  • Nanaya says:

    You have no idea how tempted I am to research and write an Anthropological thesis on the cultural background of meat consumption in Feudal Japan and its impacts and implications on their modern society, and post it here.

  • Pronas says:

    WHY IS MEAT SO FUCKING RARE OVER THERE? GOD

    Steven Den Beste says:

    Japan has a bunch of protectionist laws regarding food import. The reason that watermelons are such an icon, appproaching cliche, is that they are all grown domestically, and the supply isn’t all that great. So they’re hideously expensive. Eating watermelon is seen as a rare treat.

    Likewise meat, I suspect, though I don’t know that for sure.

    Aroduc says:

    Fairly sure it’s just that there’s not good land and/or space to raise cattle like you can most places, so beef is a luxury/import and therefore generally expensive.

    Also, the whole two hundred year ban on eating it up to the mid 19th century. A few generations of that probably engrains certain things in your culture for awhile.

    Nanaya says:

    There’s also the fact that for most of its’ past it was a very rigid society where about 99% of the population were dirt poor and killing something to eat it meant that they would lose everything else it would have ever produced, which could easily mean life and death in the future. Getting meat was something that happened once a year or so, usually with older animals who would have died anyway or very special occasions. For many hundreds of years. Yes, cultural ingraining.

    Also has a cultural similarity with the Middle East here, it brings about the whole ‘familial grudge’ against those who had harmed them/their property and a massive stigma against thieves. I could really go on about this for a lot of other world cultures.

    I actually miss writing anthropology essays. It’s just so easy to do.